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Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 8th 05, 10:28 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Questions regarding the end of Cingular/T-Mobile network sharing:

Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.

Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?

1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?

2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?

If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?

3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)

For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service

My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?

  #2  
Old May 8th 05, 11:33 PM
BruceR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It all boils down to one thing. How good is the signal where you live
and work or wherever you use it most? Regardless of price or plan, if
one is superior for your specific needs, that's your answer. If all
things are equal in that regard, then check their coverage maps for
where you're likely to travel and compare the plans based on your usage.
My experience with ATT before they became Cingular drove me to TMo where
I have always been treated very well.
As to priority for native callers vs. roamers, you'd never get them to
admit it but back in the analog days I know it was standard practice.




Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and
AT&T merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network
sharing deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV
networks to T-Mobile, until recently.

Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having
access to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real
reason to consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is
concerned?

1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?

2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls
from T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through
the network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?

If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?

3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than
the other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)

For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service

My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?



  #3  
Old May 9th 05, 01:24 AM
Richie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

wrote in message
oups.com...
Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.

Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?


No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego, California
and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile. With Cingular,
you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the post merger
Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have access to the AT&T
(Blue) network in California.


1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?


Correct.


2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?


The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for native
customers vs. roamers.
I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile, the
infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile and
Cingular customers had equal access to the network.

If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?

I would think so.

3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)

Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only in
major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in many areas
of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
infrastructure.

For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service


If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can subscribe
to hotspot separately.
T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes your
cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with any plan
then change to any other plan that fits your needs without affecting the
length of your contract.

My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?


The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.


  #4  
Old May 9th 05, 05:07 AM
rrazor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 8 May 2005 13:28:43 -0700, wrote:

Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.


Just a small correction, Cingular bought AT&T Wireless, there was no
merger.


Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?

1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?

2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?

If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?

3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)

For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service

My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?


  #5  
Old May 9th 05, 05:25 AM
SFB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about
generalizing on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here
in Northern California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR
city.. TMobile coverage is better in my neighborhood since they
installed a new tower about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at
my home by at least 2 bars.

As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name)
and you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible
account without being charged extra.

My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You
cannot generalize that one area or city has better reception. You
should try BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in
California are generally cheaper for both individual and family plans
with TMobile, BUT you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be
a benefit to you depending on your usage.

Good luck!

SFB

PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a
better selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).

Richie wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...

Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.

Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?



No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego, California
and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile. With Cingular,
you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the post merger
Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have access to the AT&T
(Blue) network in California.


1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?



Correct.


2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?



The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for native
customers vs. roamers.
I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile, the
infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile and
Cingular customers had equal access to the network.


If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?


I would think so.


3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)


Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only in
major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in many areas
of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
infrastructure.


For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service



If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can subscribe
to hotspot separately.
T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes your
cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with any plan
then change to any other plan that fits your needs without affecting the
length of your contract.


My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?



The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.



  #6  
Old May 9th 05, 06:10 AM
Richie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

You're right, customers should make a choice based on the coverage at their
location.

For contracts, independent retailers have the best deals on Cingular.
Online and in stores, they often push 2 year contacts for any kind of
decent phone.

I like T-Mobile a lot. The company is innovative and the price is right.
If it weren't for the rollover minutes at Cingular I would have the T-Mobile
Regional Plan for $49.99.

"SFB" wrote in message
...
That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about generalizing
on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here in Northern
California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR city.. TMobile
coverage is better in my neighborhood since they installed a new tower
about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at my home by at least 2
bars.

As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name) and
you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible account
without being charged extra.

My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You cannot
generalize that one area or city has better reception. You should try
BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in California are
generally cheaper for both individual and family plans with TMobile, BUT
you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be a benefit to you
depending on your usage.

Good luck!

SFB

PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a better
selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).

Richie wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...

Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.

Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?



No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego,
California and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile.
With Cingular, you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the post
merger Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have access to
the AT&T (Blue) network in California.


1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?



Correct.


2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?



The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for
native customers vs. roamers.
I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile,
the infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile
and Cingular customers had equal access to the network.


If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?


I would think so.


3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)


Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only in
major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in many
areas of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
infrastructure.


For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service



If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can
subscribe to hotspot separately.
T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes
your cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with
any plan then change to any other plan that fits your needs without
affecting the length of your contract.


My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?



The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.





  #7  
Old May 9th 05, 03:21 PM
JohnF
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"BruceR" wrote in message
...
It all boils down to one thing. How good is the signal where you live and
work or wherever you use it most? Regardless of price or plan, if one is
superior for your specific needs, that's your answer. If all things are
equal in that regard, then check their coverage maps for where you're
likely to travel and compare the plans based on your usage. My experience
with ATT before they became Cingular drove me to TMo where I have always
been treated very well.
As to priority for native callers vs. roamers, you'd never get them to
admit it but back in the analog days I know it was standard practice.


All very good points. Except that it not good enough to check the maps but
to actually have a phone in hand and try it in the places you'll likely be
using the phone. In my case lack of coverage for TMo in my area drove me to
ATT. Just as lack of coverage for Cingular GSM after the merger keeps me on
TDMA.


  #8  
Old May 9th 05, 04:50 PM
Irv
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

i have t-mobile in los angeles and my motorola v300 gave me horrible
coverage at home and office. i switched to an unlocked razr and it always
says cingular roaming and the razr is much more sensitive than the v300 and
the coverage is much better at home and office. during one recent call to
t-mobile, i was told they were doing software upgrades on the v300 but when
i called back to do it, they didn't know what i was talking about. so it
goes.


Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.


Just a small correction, Cingular bought AT&T Wireless, there was no
merger.


Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?

1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?

2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?

If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?

3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)

For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service

My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?




  #9  
Old May 9th 05, 10:38 PM
Danska
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Richie" wrote in message
om...
You're right, customers should make a choice based on the coverage at
their location.

For contracts, independent retailers have the best deals on Cingular.
Online and in stores, they often push 2 year contacts for any kind of
decent phone.

I like T-Mobile a lot. The company is innovative and the price is right.
If it weren't for the rollover minutes at Cingular I would have the
T-Mobile Regional Plan for $49.99.

Doesn't that have like 3000 minutes or something? With that many minutes,
would rollover even matter?


"SFB" wrote in message
...
That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about generalizing
on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here in Northern
California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR city.. TMobile
coverage is better in my neighborhood since they installed a new tower
about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at my home by at least 2
bars.

As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name) and
you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible account
without being charged extra.

My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You
cannot generalize that one area or city has better reception. You should
try BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in California are
generally cheaper for both individual and family plans with TMobile, BUT
you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be a benefit to you
depending on your usage.

Good luck!

SFB

PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a
better selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).

Richie wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...

Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.

Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?


No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego,
California and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile.
With Cingular, you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the
post merger Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have
access to the AT&T (Blue) network in California.


1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?


Correct.


2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?


The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for
native customers vs. roamers.
I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile,
the infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile
and Cingular customers had equal access to the network.


If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?


I would think so.


3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)


Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only
in major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in
many areas of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
infrastructure.


For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service



If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can
subscribe to hotspot separately.
T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes
your cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with
any plan then change to any other plan that fits your needs without
affecting the length of your contract.


My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?


The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.







  #10  
Old May 10th 05, 12:55 AM
razor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 9 May 2005 15:38:19 -0500, "Danska" wrote:


"Richie" wrote in message
. com...
You're right, customers should make a choice based on the coverage at
their location.

For contracts, independent retailers have the best deals on Cingular.
Online and in stores, they often push 2 year contacts for any kind of
decent phone.

I like T-Mobile a lot. The company is innovative and the price is right.
If it weren't for the rollover minutes at Cingular I would have the
T-Mobile Regional Plan for $49.99.

Doesn't that have like 3000 minutes or something? With that many minutes,
would rollover even matter?



I am not sure about the 49.99 plan but I do know they just started offering
1000 minutes, including free nights & weekends, for 45.99. With T-Mobile
you have to read the small print when it comes to these plans more than any
other provider. The plan I just mentioned does not include free M2M. I
think they want an extra 6.95 a month for that.


"SFB" wrote in message
...
That was an excellent response... albeit I do disagree about generalizing
on Cingular vs TMobile in California. I have had BOTH here in Northern
California, and I am in a fringe area not near any MAJOR city.. TMobile
coverage is better in my neighborhood since they installed a new tower
about a year ago. Cingular has weaker coverage at my home by at least 2
bars.

As for roaming on the old AT&T.. north of me (Ukiah to Eureka) has
coverage provided by another GSM company (Edge I believe is the name) and
you can roam on their network with either a Cingular or TMobible account
without being charged extra.

My point is, like others have said, every situation is unique. You
cannot generalize that one area or city has better reception. You should
try BOTH companies before finally deciding. Rates here in California are
generally cheaper for both individual and family plans with TMobile, BUT
you do get rollover on Cingular that may or may not be a benefit to you
depending on your usage.

Good luck!

SFB

PS I should say that TMobile has one year contracts and MOST (not all)
Cingular contracts are for 2 years. Also, Cingular currently has a
better selection in phones than TMobile (again only in my opinion).

Richie wrote:
wrote in message
oups.com...

Being away from the US for sometime, I was aware that Cingular and AT&T
merged but I wasn't aware that Cingular & T-Mobiles' network sharing
deal ended and that Cingular actually sold their CA & NV networks to
T-Mobile, until recently.

Given the fact that that Cingular customers are allowed to roam on the
legacy network (T-Mobile) for the next 4 years as well as having access
to the new network they acquired from AT&T, is there any real reason to
consider T-Mobile at all as far as network coverage is concerned?


No. Especially if you want the best coverage. I'm in San Diego,
California and I find that Cingular has better coverage than T-Mobile.
With Cingular, you get access to the pre-merger infrastructure + the
post merger Cingular/AT&T network. T-Mobile customers do not have
access to the AT&T (Blue) network in California.


1) According to the press release last year, Cingular customers would
be able to roam on the old network for up to 4 years. Has this been
confirmed in the final terms of the deal?


Correct.


2) If T-Mobile & Cingular are essentially the same network IN CA & NV
with the exception of AT&T Wireless - is it safe to say that calls from
T-Mobile customers would be given 'priority' when routed through the
network compared to Cingular users who are merely roaming on their
legacy network? - Or are calls from either carrier handled in the
exactly same manner?


The network handles all calls the same way. There is no priority for
native customers vs. roamers.
I don't know about now, but before the sale of the network to T-Mobile,
the infrastructure was operated by a jointly owned affiliate. T-Mobile
and Cingular customers had equal access to the network.


If the latter is true, then the Cingular network would obviously be
superior for customers in CA or NV. Right?


I would think so.


3) How does overall nationwide service compare between the two
carriers? Which carrier has coverage in more markets in the United
States and is either carrier considered to have better service than the
other in certain parts of the country? (East coast for example)


Nationwide coverage with Cingular is better. T-Mobile works well only
in major markets. Cingular now has 850MHz and 1900MHz coverage in
many areas of the country. T-Mobile does not have access to the 850MHz
infrastructure.


For customers in CA or NV:
The only factors I could up with where T-Mobile could excel:
- Customer Service
- I haven't done a detailed comparison but perhaps cheaper voice/data
plans
- T-Mobile Hotspot Service



If you need hotspot, then T-Mobile is a better choice. Or you can
subscribe to hotspot separately.
T-Mobile price plans are cheaper but if you factor in rollover minutes
your cost per minute would be lower. Cingular allows you to start with
any plan then change to any other plan that fits your needs without
affecting the length of your contract.


My apologies for the lengthy post. I don't have service yet with
either carrier so I just want to see if there is any real reason to
consider T-Mobile - and if so, WHY?


The only reason I would consider T-Mobile in California is if I get a
substantially better deal in terms of cost per minute. The same would
apply to Verizon or Sprint for that matter.







 




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