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Eur: 3G Mobile Signals Can Cause Nausea, Headache -Study



 
 
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  #31  
Old October 8th 03, 06:09 PM
Thomas Zielinski
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Yeah... drowning... severe steam burns... floods... dihydrogen
monoxide (or HOH) is pretty damn serious if you ask me! We should
spend more money studying it... in double blind studies... by people
in lab coats... the media would love that.. the people would
believe...

What a circus... Science education standards in this country are
extremely poor, to say the least.

-Tom



"John R. Copeland" wrote in message .. .
Specifically, the story was about di-hydrogen monoxide.
Scary stuff, no?
It actually can kill people!
---JRC---

"3G Geek" wrote in message
...
This is somewhat off subject but this reminds me of a funny story I
read... There was an article written as a joke in a small towns local
newspaper that there was this extremely harmful chemical that had been
showing up HOH... (better known as H20 or water.) The whole town took
it for truth and started freaking out. It's just kind of funny, if
everyone avoided everything that the studies told us to avoid we would
live in a white padded room with nothing to eat or drink.

  #32  
Old October 8th 03, 08:13 PM
RDT
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In article ,
John Henderson wrote:
"Al Klein" wrote:
Because science, even the simplest science, is a mystery to
most people.

Arthur C Clark once noted that science and technology are
indistinguishable from magic to those who don't understand them.


Not quite. It was something more like any sufficiently developed
technology is indistinguishable from magic.

RDT
--
"The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the
inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries."
--- Sir Winston Churchill

  #33  
Old October 8th 03, 09:20 PM
Quark
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Thomas Zielinski wrote:
Yeah... drowning... severe steam burns... floods... dihydrogen
monoxide (or HOH) is pretty damn serious if you ask me! We should
spend more money studying it... in double blind studies... by people
in lab coats... the media would love that.. the people would
believe...

What a circus... Science education standards in this country are
extremely poor, to say the least.

-Tom


And so are government standards for handing out millions for stupid
studies that prove nothing. Except fill the pockets of the people who
get the money to do these type of things.

I should try to get a grant to see if sticking raisons up my nose causes
cancer

Hamburgers cooked on a grill cause cancer.
Wait now it doesn't cause cancer.

Eggs are bad for you.
Wait now there not.

etc. etc. etc.....

  #34  
Old October 9th 03, 02:23 AM
Al Klein
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On Wed, 8 Oct 2003 12:28:37 +1000, "John Henderson"
posted in alt.cellular.verizon:

"Al Klein" wrote:


Because science, even the simplest science, is a mystery to
most people.


Arthur C Clark once noted that science and technology are
indistinguishable from magic to those who don't understand them.


Exactly. And everyday science is sufficiently advanced to be magic to
most.
  #36  
Old October 9th 03, 07:19 PM
John Michael Williams
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Whytoi wrote in message ...
In article [email protected], Hopper
wrote:

X-No-Archive:Yes

wrote in message
...
If true the implications for the 2.1 GHz band are not good...

http://tinyurl.com/p873


The thing that ****es me off about news stories of this kind are the
complete lack of reference to any information about the study, short it
involving the Netherlands.

Where was this report published? Where can a person find the original
report? What was the title?

There's just too many questions. Like what sampling did they do? What level
of significance? What was the test method? These can only be answered by the
original report, not halfassed Reuters reporting.



You can download a PDF of the study at http://www.tno.nl/en/news/article_6265.html

The first few pages are a Dutch summary, but the rest is English.

It was a double-blind study done by I think physicists and
electrical engineers. Their degrees are given, but not
the courses they studied in school; I doubt they studied
WCDMA effects on humans in school, so I don't think their
schoolwork matters (except that they passed, of course).

The pulse heights were 1 V/m, which is very low. Cell
phones produce hundreds of V/m at the head. Assuming a
5000 V/m transmitter and square-law nondirectionality,
at 1 m the height would be about 400 V/m. I don't know
much about PCS base stations, so I am pretty much guessing
at the 5000 V/m.

Anyway, adding a little directionality, the pulse E fields
would be comparable to those at about 20 m (65 ft) from
the antenna.

John

John Michael Williams
  #37  
Old October 12th 03, 07:46 AM
John Michael Williams
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OOPS! Correction below:

(John Michael Williams) wrote in message . com...
Whytoi wrote in message ...
In article [email protected], Hopper
wrote:

X-No-Archive:Yes

wrote in message
...
If true the implications for the 2.1 GHz band are not good...

http://tinyurl.com/p873

The thing that ****es me off about news stories of this kind are the
complete lack of reference to any information about the study, short it
involving the Netherlands.

Where was this report published? Where can a person find the original
report? What was the title?

There's just too many questions. Like what sampling did they do? What level
of significance? What was the test method? These can only be answered by the
original report, not halfassed Reuters reporting.



You can download a PDF of the study at http://www.tno.nl/en/news/article_6265.html

The first few pages are a Dutch summary, but the rest is English.

It was a double-blind study done by I think physicists and
electrical engineers. Their degrees are given, but not
the courses they studied in school; I doubt they studied
WCDMA effects on humans in school, so I don't think their
schoolwork matters (except that they passed, of course).

The pulse heights were 1 V/m, which is very low. Cell
phones produce hundreds of V/m at the head. Assuming a
5000 V/m transmitter and square-law nondirectionality,
at 1 m the height would be about 400 V/m. I don't know
much about PCS base stations, so I am pretty much guessing
at the 5000 V/m.


I usually work with power (watts/cm^2) rather than voltage.
I used the wrong approach to calculate voltage at a distance:
Voltage V of the EM field drops off as 1/r, not 1/r^2; the
square applies when the power (~V^2/Z) is relevant.

Let's try it again:

Broadcasting at 100 W, the field at 1 m would be
about 100/(4*Pi*r^2) or about 8 W/m^2. The impedance of
free space is Z = 377 ohms, so V^2/377 = 8, making
V = about 55 V/m.

So, with a PCS transmitter at 100 W, the Dutch study would be
at about the same level as would be found over 50 m from the PCS
transmitter.

This is quite a long distance and should raise some considerable
concern.

A 1000 W transmitter would produce the same effect as the Dutch
study out to about 180 m, and a 10 W transmitter out to less
than 20 m, which was about what I got the wrong way above.

John

John Michael Williams


Anyway, adding a little directionality, the pulse E fields
would be comparable to those at about 20 m (65 ft) from
the antenna.

John

John Michael Williams

 




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