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Credit Inquiry by Cingular Wireless



 
 
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  #11  
Old May 31st 04, 06:12 PM
Tee Box
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Go to this link and pay very close attention to para 604.
http://www.ftc.gov/os/statutes/fcra.htm#604

"Sharon Needles" wrote in message
...
Not true. Unless you specifically give a credit card company
permission, they cannot pull your credit report.

Credit card companies DO send out pre-approvals based upon your credit
history, but always note, it is subject to change until a credit
report is actually ran for that particular company.

They can look all they want as it does NOT put an inquiry on your
report. The only time it will put an inquiry on your report is when
you give them permission to do so.

SN



On Mon, 31 May 2004 07:03:48 -0600, "RWEmerson"
wrote:


"John S." wrote in message
...
What would you do?

First I would forget about it.

Then get on with my life.

The two above actions would be prudent because there is no recourse.

ANY
retail
company can run a credit report on ANY person that they get a SSN for

unless
that person has previously told the company that they can't.

--
John S.


John is exactly on point. If you've ever checked your own credit report,
you'll likely find that it has been checked, in some cases repeatedly, by
various entitiies, particular credit card companies wanting to find new
customers to mail unsolicited applications to. They don't need, and don't
request, your permission to do so.




  #12  
Old May 31st 04, 06:18 PM
Tee Box
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

And the following from privacyrights.org


Can the information in my credit file be used for any other purposes?

Yes. The practice of generating and selling lists for use in "pre-approved"
credit and insurance offers is allowed by law. Trans Union, Experian and
Equifax all engage in selling lists of consumers who meet certain criteria
in order to receive a "firm" offer of credit or insurance. This is the
source of the many pre-approved credit offers most consumers receive in the
mail. "Pre-approved" and so-called "firm" offers of credit, however, can be
somewhat misleading. A creditor may legally look at your report before
making the offer. If you respond, the creditor may again access your report
before you are actually granted credit. They can deny your credit
application at that time. This is explained in the fine print on the
pre-approved offer.

The law does not allow CRAs to compile and sell information from credit
reports for the purpose of direct marketing. Although CRAs have engaged in
this practice in the past, the Federal Trade Commission, on March 1, 2000,
ruled that Trans Union violated the FCRA by the sale of personal credit
information for target marketing purposes. To read the FTC's full opinion,
see www.ftc.gov/opa/2000/03/transunion.htm. Trans Union has appealed the FTC
's decision and the matter is now under review in federal court. Equifax
states it does not sell lists used for direct or target marketing. Experian,
on the other hand, sells lists of consumers to marketers derived from
consumer surveys, demographics sources, and public records. Experian states
that it does not sell information obtained directly from credit reports for
marketing purposes. See www.experian.com/directmktg/lists.html.

You can remove your name from any list compiled by a CRA, whether the list
is for pre-approved credit offers or direct marketing. To "opt-out," that
is, to remove your name from mailing lists compiled by credit bureaus, call
the toll-free number all CRAs are required by law to maintain for this
purpose: (888) 5OPTOUT or (888) 567-8688. This phone number can be used to
remove your name from the list of all three CRAs. You may also write to the
CRA, and the CRA may also provide an online means for opting-out.

"Sharon Needles" wrote in message
...
Not true. Unless you specifically give a credit card company
permission, they cannot pull your credit report.

Credit card companies DO send out pre-approvals based upon your credit
history, but always note, it is subject to change until a credit
report is actually ran for that particular company.

They can look all they want as it does NOT put an inquiry on your
report. The only time it will put an inquiry on your report is when
you give them permission to do so.

SN



On Mon, 31 May 2004 07:03:48 -0600, "RWEmerson"
wrote:


"John S." wrote in message
...
What would you do?

First I would forget about it.

Then get on with my life.

The two above actions would be prudent because there is no recourse.

ANY
retail
company can run a credit report on ANY person that they get a SSN for

unless
that person has previously told the company that they can't.

--
John S.


John is exactly on point. If you've ever checked your own credit report,
you'll likely find that it has been checked, in some cases repeatedly, by
various entitiies, particular credit card companies wanting to find new
customers to mail unsolicited applications to. They don't need, and don't
request, your permission to do so.




  #13  
Old May 31st 04, 06:19 PM
Tee Box
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sorry, there are very specific ways of correcting/disputing information, and
this is not one of them.

"John S." wrote in message
...
Do you work for a credit reporting company? I do and am well aware of

what
can and can't be done.


I would like to correspond with you a bit because of issues I have and

don't
know how to correct.

E-Mail me?

--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net



  #14  
Old May 31st 04, 10:03 PM
Scott Stephenson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sharon Needles" wrote in message
...
You have missed the point. My wife did NOT authorize anyone from
Cingular to pull her credit report. My wife's mother did NOT
authorize anyone from Cingular to pull her daughter's credit report.
They did it on their own. They got the SSN from the port request from
ATTWS and ran her credit without her consent.

What don't you understand about this? I have made myself very clear.
Do you work for Cingular?

Consumers do have rights. The Fair Credit Reporting Act was created
for disputes just like this.


Actually, the FCRA was enacted to give consumers a path of action if there
were errors on their credit report, and to prevent false information from
hitting your credit report (among other things not related to the report).
Your credit report is accurate- Cingular did the credit check. There is
nothing to dispute. The phone number that was being ported was associated
with your wife's credit (prior to the port). By allowing someone to port
that number, you have given permission for the companies to perform whatever
business practices they have in effect to port a number. If running the
credit report of the person responsible for the number is a part of that
business process, they are within their rights to do so. The only person
you would have a beef with is the person who initiated the porting process,
because it appears that they set a course of action into motion that is
unacceptable to you.


  #15  
Old June 1st 04, 12:11 AM
RWEmerson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sharon Needles" wrote in message
...
Not true. Unless you specifically give a credit card company
permission, they cannot pull your credit report.

Credit card companies DO send out pre-approvals based upon your credit
history, but always note, it is subject to change until a credit
report is actually ran for that particular company.

They can look all they want as it does NOT put an inquiry on your
report. The only time it will put an inquiry on your report is when
you give them permission to do so.

[SNIP]

Simply incorrect. Your anger is based in large measure on not understanding
the issue. As Tee Box suggested, you ought to get over this and move on.


  #16  
Old June 1st 04, 12:12 AM
RWEmerson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Tee Box" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Go to this link and pay very close attention to para 604.
http://www.ftc.gov/os/statutes/fcra.htm#604


Bingo!


  #17  
Old June 1st 04, 12:14 AM
RWEmerson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Tee Box" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
And the following from privacyrights.org


Can the information in my credit file be used for any other purposes?

Yes. The practice of generating and selling lists for use in

"pre-approved"
credit and insurance offers is allowed by law. Trans Union, Experian and
Equifax all engage in selling lists of consumers who meet certain criteria
in order to receive a "firm" offer of credit or insurance. This is the
source of the many pre-approved credit offers most consumers receive in

the
mail. "Pre-approved" and so-called "firm" offers of credit, however, can

be
somewhat misleading. A creditor may legally look at your report before
making the offer. If you respond, the creditor may again access your

report
before you are actually granted credit. They can deny your credit
application at that time. This is explained in the fine print on the
pre-approved offer.

[SNIP]

Bingo, bingo!


  #18  
Old June 1st 04, 12:18 AM
RWEmerson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Tee Box" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
First, companies can only request a credit report when they have a valid
reason to do so.
Second, if you have an account with any company, they can and do run
periodic checks on you.
Third, the inquires that you see from credit card companies are not

specific
to your SSN. They are generated in bulk based upon criteria set by the
requestor. They didn't use your SSN to access it. That's what generates
the mail you get for new cards.
Fourth, you can request that credit bureaus not include you in those
marketing searches and/or no requests without your specific permission.
Fifth, as someone else said, get over it.


Correct on all points. It isn't an [entirely] random process. Your #4 (and
#5) is much to the point, it seems to me.


  #19  
Old June 2nd 04, 07:25 AM
Todd Allcock
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sharon Needles wrote in message
. ..

My mother-inlaw did NOT give the Cingular representative my wife's
SSN. No one from Cingular even contacted us to get an authorization
approval.


Then how did your mother-in-law get the number ported? Unless I'm
gravely mistaken, only the "owner" of the number can port it. You
said your mother-in-law "deactivated" the AT&T phone THEN ported to
Cingular. I think you're misunderstanding the situation- you can't
port after you cancel service. The porting process cancels the
service for you. If you cancel first, your number is "lost" and can't
be ported anywhere.

My wild guess is that something like this happened- your Mother-in-law
goes to Cingular to port. Cingular says "but Mrs. Mother-in-law, this
isn't your account, it's your daughter's..." M-i-l gives copy of
daughter's bill to Cingular, Cingular gets vocal permission from your
wife to port (the permission to close the AT&T account that you
mentioned), ported your wife's AT&T account to Cingular (resulting in
the credit check you're complaining about) THEN, transferred the
contract from daughter's name to mother's, which is the only way I can
think of to accomplish this particular port.

So, frankly, instead of bashing Cingular for an "unauthorized" credit
inquiry, you should probably commend them for their creativity, since
they did the near-impossible- they ported your wife's number to her
mother!

Are you sure your wife didn't just misunderstand what she was giving
permission for?

Cingular obtained my wife's SSN from ATTWS during the port from ATTWS
to Cingular.


I don't think so. If I understand the porting proceedure, AT&T has no
direct contact with Cingular. After Cingular activates service, AT&T
is electronically notified by a third-party company (who handles the
porting requests) to cancel the prior service. Cingular gets no
information from AT&T, and AT&T gets none from Cingular (except the
electronic equivalent of "Sorry suckers, you lost another one. Cancel
this customer's service...") All information is supplied by the
consumer doing the port. The SSN, if obtained by Cingular, HAD to
come from your wife or her mother.

They then took it upon themselves to pull the credit
report of my wife.


If my theory is correct, they had to actually activate service in your
wife's name as well, even if only for a minute, prior to transferring
it into her mother's. They got permission to do THAT from someone-
perhaps from her mother (which would also be improper, but IMHO far
more "forgivable".)

As much as you're complaining about this credit inquiry, imagine how
much you'd be complaining if people could port _other_ people's
numbers! Maybe I like your number so much I'll just port it in my
name to Cingular... ;-) Seriously- por ing can't be done by anyone
but the number's "owner", which in this case is your wife.

I am not barking up an empty tree.


Perhaps not, but I think you're missing a piece of this puzzle that
either your wife or her mother misunderstood or doesn't remember.

Regardless, (I almost wrote "irregardless" just to get a rise out of
John S.!), say Cingular "accidentally" ran the report. What are your
damages? If Cingular removes the inquiry, you are "safe" from any
credit harm.

Have you read the Fair Credit Reporting Act? Consumers do have
rights.


Yes, and companies sometimes make mistakes. No harm, no foul. If a
cell company had to run my credit to straighten out a problem with MY
mother's account I'd find that FAR less objectionable than any one of
the dozens of "routine" inquiries on my report for the "pre-approved"
credit card solicitations I receive daily in the mail.

Are you POSITIVE it was AT&T and not Cingular who spoke to your wife?
Again, if AT&T closed the account, there could be no port to Cingular
(or anyone else), and then the whole story doesn't make any sense.
Somebody's remembering the events incorrectly here, I'd wager...

Good luck.




  #20  
Old June 2nd 04, 01:16 PM
John S.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I am not barking up an empty tree.

Perhaps not, but I think you're missing a piece of this puzzle that
either your wife or her mother misunderstood or doesn't remember.


If not empty, then the WRONG tree.

Why is this thread still going on? People have their credit checked all the
time and no one thinks less of their credit rating.

Get on with your life and take this someplace else.

--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net
 




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