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! --> Has anyone here ever had their phone repaired under a Motorola warranty?



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 28th 04, 11:59 AM
MOTOROLA USER
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ! --> Has anyone here ever had their phone repaired under a Motorola warranty?


MOTOROLA QUESTION:

Has anyone here ever had their phone repaired under a Motorola warranty (or
any Motorola Product) who first wrote their personal ID in or on their
phone? Example: Customer uses an electric pencil to write their name and or
year of birth on the inside metal plate found underneath the phone battery,
some even use their social security number.

Note: Should you ever need to send your new Motorola phone in for warranty
repair, I strongly advise you to (mark the inside of your phone) with an
electric pencil first. When you get your phone back, see if they actually
sent you your own phone back or a sub phone instead ((and then they tried to
pass it off to you as your original new phone)) as this is exactly what
happened to me, but there is far more to this story than that. First, you
should mark your phone very lightly (or any new Motorola product slated for
repair) with an electric pencil in small to very small text, so as your
personal ID can only be seen if the light on it is just right. This is VERY
easy to do.

Hint, you will need to grab a decent camera, (digital is great) and take
quite a FEW close-up pictures of your personal ID that you just wrote inside
of your Motorola phone or product, remembering to get the light (just right)
so as your personal ID will show up in your pictures. Be sure to take clear,
(sharp pictures) of both the front and back of your Motorola product. Then,
when you do get your phone back claiming that they fixed and returned your
original new phone, see if your personal information that you wrote inside
of the phone is still there. If not, they switched your new phone for an old
refurbished phone. (((And of course this is to be expected, right?))) But
wait a minute...

HERE IS THE REAL KICKER: Now, since you truly know for sure that Motorola
has in fact subsisted your new phone for a used phone (despite that they
claimed they repaired and returned your original new phone back to you) now
take a (real close look) at the serial number inside of the phone that
Motorola returned to you. If it's the same serial number of the original new
phone that you sent in, (((yet the personal ID you wrote inside of the phone
is gone for some reason,))) THEN YOU'VE BEEN HAD.

Know that regardless what you were told (or lead to believe) that the phone
that was sent back to you was still your original phone, the one that you
had originally sent in, has actually been exchange. What they did was change
the serial number and ID number to disguise the phone they returned to you
to look (exactly) like the one you had originally sent in, model and all.
The method that is used is used to swap out serial numbers is high-tech on
an old low-tech idea. You see, when Motorola, Verizon, Nextel, Suncom, etc.,
issues you a new or used phone to replace the one you sent in, your account
is suppose to reflect that replacement phone (regardless of model) with a
new serial number on your account, ticket or receipt, as well as inside of
your replacement phone. If this has in fact happened to you and you call
their customer care, you most likely will discover they have no record of
any repair or exchange for the phone you sent in. So you better hang on to
all paperwork, especially that from FedEx, UPS, etc as that will be your
only proof that you sent in your new phone. Then again, they can say that
you could of put anything in that box for that matter. However, the shipping
receipt returning the phone back to you is a whole different story.

You see, all cell phones are given there own (unique) serial number and an
ID number, and it is illegal to tamper with the original ID numbers of any
cell phone, electronics in general, automobiles and so forth. This
dishonest, yet old practice, is designed to fool the consumer by trying to
pass off older and used products as original and/or new equipment. So unless
you went out of your way to mark your new equipment and then document what
you did with a camera (and a couple of witness when possible,) or you will
not have a leg to stand on and you WILL NOT KNOW otherwise what has happened
once they start changing serial numbers around. Of course this is very
common among dishonest car dealers and thieves in the auto industry to
change vehicle identification numbers, better known as a VIN number that
serves as a master serial number for an automobile. But now this dishonest
practice has found its way into the electronic industry, as I have now
became a victim of this practice. I need your help, by seeing how many
others out there have had this happen to them, that is, if you are even
aware of it because you went out of your way to mark your phone like I did.
Since I have owned lots of electronic gear over the years, this is something
I have practiced for as long as I can remember; in the event my gear is ever
stolen. So if the police find it, they just might know whom it belongs to,
as long as the thief has not scratched off my personal identification.

Who knows how far and wide spread this practice goes. So give it a whirl and
mark your electronics before you send them off to any given company for that
matter, or you may never truly know otherwise that your gear has now been
(switched out) for the same model, from a couple years or so back, that most
likely has a lot of mileage already on it. It's one thing to exercise their
right to replace your Motorola gear with a replacement (as outlined in all
Motorola warranties) but it's a whole different ball game when a company
misleads the consumers into thinking they still have their original new
phone, only to learn that a given company swapped out serial numbers with
older gear (to hide the fact) that that actually gave you used equipment.
Since Motorola warranty states that they reserve that option, why then go
through all the trouble to hide what they did? To save them big! You see, if
your phone breaks down beyond repair in a very short period of time, they
are obligated to give you a brand new phone, NOT a used one. Not to mention,
lots of people pay for replacement insurance each month so as to insure they
get a new phone in the event something happens to theirs.

But the bigger picture is that time is money and it's easier and quicker for
a big company such as Motorola to ship you out someone else's used (possibly
dropped phone,) then it is to try and fix it right away. Eventually, someone
will try and refurbish your new phone, and thus your new phone that you paid
a nice new price for, will soon become someone else's property, only (more
than likely) to be passed on as new, once they switch the serial numbers
around to match the next unsuspecting customer's original serial number. If
you're a little confused with what I'm saying, you may want to read the last
two paragraphs again. It's important that you understand that switching
serial numbers out makes it next to impossible to know what is going on,
thus the consumer is clueless that their new phone actually never came back
to them, (((despite the customer was lead to believe otherwise.))) In law
enforcement, it's best known as white or blue collar crime.

Should you run into this problem, please contact me here and join me and
others who are currently working together in looking deeper into this
problem to in turn fight back. Sure most cell phones are pretty cheep, "so
what" you might say, but other equipment from Motorola (as well as other
companies) can easily run into the thousand to the tens of thousands of
dollars, thus serial number swapping can easily save big companies tens of
millions of dollars yearly.

I look forward to hearing from those who try this little test over the
months ahead. Please don't try and defend any of these companies, as that
will only lead others to think that you might work for them. Simply
understand that in no way am I saying that this practice is widespread, or
that all companies practice serial number swapping, just that it is being
done and for the wrong reasons, as it has now happened to me. Sure you can
say you see all kinds of crap in newsgroups and this post is no different,
but I challenge you to have an open mind in this particular case.

I know this post may receive an avalanche of responses; I will do my best to
respond to as many as I can over the weeks and months ahead. However, I will
do my best to avoid answering replies that are non constructive who's
objective is to cause friction within our group, to dumb-me-down, or try to
deny that this kind of practice does not happen and thus could not of
possibly happened to me, especially with Motorola. I say unto you, THINK
AGAIN.


Thank you for your valuable time and good luck in your ID repair test!

Jim





  #2  
Old December 2nd 04, 03:18 AM
bamp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"MOTOROLA USER" wrote in message
nk.net...

MOTOROLA QUESTION:

Has anyone here ever had their phone repaired under a Motorola warranty
(or
any Motorola Product) who first wrote their personal ID in or on their
phone? Example: Customer uses an electric pencil to write their name and
or
year of birth on the inside metal plate found underneath the phone
battery,
some even use their social security number.

Note: Should you ever need to send your new Motorola phone in for warranty
repair, I strongly advise you to (mark the inside of your phone) with an
electric pencil first. When you get your phone back, see if they actually
sent you your own phone back or a sub phone instead ((and then they tried
to
pass it off to you as your original new phone)) as this is exactly what
happened to me, but there is far more to this story than that. First, you
should mark your phone very lightly (or any new Motorola product slated
for
repair) with an electric pencil in small to very small text, so as your
personal ID can only be seen if the light on it is just right. This is
VERY
easy to do.

Hint, you will need to grab a decent camera, (digital is great) and take
quite a FEW close-up pictures of your personal ID that you just wrote
inside
of your Motorola phone or product, remembering to get the light (just
right)
so as your personal ID will show up in your pictures. Be sure to take
clear,
(sharp pictures) of both the front and back of your Motorola product.
Then,
when you do get your phone back claiming that they fixed and returned your
original new phone, see if your personal information that you wrote inside
of the phone is still there. If not, they switched your new phone for an
old
refurbished phone. (((And of course this is to be expected, right?))) But
wait a minute...

HERE IS THE REAL KICKER: Now, since you truly know for sure that Motorola
has in fact subsisted your new phone for a used phone (despite that they
claimed they repaired and returned your original new phone back to you)
now
take a (real close look) at the serial number inside of the phone that
Motorola returned to you. If it's the same serial number of the original
new
phone that you sent in, (((yet the personal ID you wrote inside of the
phone
is gone for some reason,))) THEN YOU'VE BEEN HAD.

Know that regardless what you were told (or lead to believe) that the
phone
that was sent back to you was still your original phone, the one that you
had originally sent in, has actually been exchange. What they did was
change
the serial number and ID number to disguise the phone they returned to you
to look (exactly) like the one you had originally sent in, model and all.
The method that is used is used to swap out serial numbers is high-tech on
an old low-tech idea. You see, when Motorola, Verizon, Nextel, Suncom,
etc.,
issues you a new or used phone to replace the one you sent in, your
account
is suppose to reflect that replacement phone (regardless of model) with a
new serial number on your account, ticket or receipt, as well as inside of
your replacement phone. If this has in fact happened to you and you call
their customer care, you most likely will discover they have no record of
any repair or exchange for the phone you sent in. So you better hang on to
all paperwork, especially that from FedEx, UPS, etc as that will be your
only proof that you sent in your new phone. Then again, they can say that
you could of put anything in that box for that matter. However, the
shipping
receipt returning the phone back to you is a whole different story.

You see, all cell phones are given there own (unique) serial number and an
ID number, and it is illegal to tamper with the original ID numbers of any
cell phone, electronics in general, automobiles and so forth. This
dishonest, yet old practice, is designed to fool the consumer by trying to
pass off older and used products as original and/or new equipment. So
unless
you went out of your way to mark your new equipment and then document what
you did with a camera (and a couple of witness when possible,) or you will
not have a leg to stand on and you WILL NOT KNOW otherwise what has
happened
once they start changing serial numbers around. Of course this is very
common among dishonest car dealers and thieves in the auto industry to
change vehicle identification numbers, better known as a VIN number that
serves as a master serial number for an automobile. But now this dishonest
practice has found its way into the electronic industry, as I have now
became a victim of this practice. I need your help, by seeing how many
others out there have had this happen to them, that is, if you are even
aware of it because you went out of your way to mark your phone like I
did.
Since I have owned lots of electronic gear over the years, this is
something
I have practiced for as long as I can remember; in the event my gear is
ever
stolen. So if the police find it, they just might know whom it belongs to,
as long as the thief has not scratched off my personal identification.

Who knows how far and wide spread this practice goes. So give it a whirl
and
mark your electronics before you send them off to any given company for
that
matter, or you may never truly know otherwise that your gear has now been
(switched out) for the same model, from a couple years or so back, that
most
likely has a lot of mileage already on it. It's one thing to exercise
their
right to replace your Motorola gear with a replacement (as outlined in all
Motorola warranties) but it's a whole different ball game when a company
misleads the consumers into thinking they still have their original new
phone, only to learn that a given company swapped out serial numbers with
older gear (to hide the fact) that that actually gave you used equipment.
Since Motorola warranty states that they reserve that option, why then go
through all the trouble to hide what they did? To save them big! You see,
if
your phone breaks down beyond repair in a very short period of time, they
are obligated to give you a brand new phone, NOT a used one. Not to
mention,
lots of people pay for replacement insurance each month so as to insure
they
get a new phone in the event something happens to theirs.

But the bigger picture is that time is money and it's easier and quicker
for
a big company such as Motorola to ship you out someone else's used
(possibly
dropped phone,) then it is to try and fix it right away. Eventually,
someone
will try and refurbish your new phone, and thus your new phone that you
paid
a nice new price for, will soon become someone else's property, only (more
than likely) to be passed on as new, once they switch the serial numbers
around to match the next unsuspecting customer's original serial number.
If
you're a little confused with what I'm saying, you may want to read the
last
two paragraphs again. It's important that you understand that switching
serial numbers out makes it next to impossible to know what is going on,
thus the consumer is clueless that their new phone actually never came
back
to them, (((despite the customer was lead to believe otherwise.))) In law
enforcement, it's best known as white or blue collar crime.

Should you run into this problem, please contact me here and join me and
others who are currently working together in looking deeper into this
problem to in turn fight back. Sure most cell phones are pretty cheep, "so
what" you might say, but other equipment from Motorola (as well as other
companies) can easily run into the thousand to the tens of thousands of
dollars, thus serial number swapping can easily save big companies tens of
millions of dollars yearly.

I look forward to hearing from those who try this little test over the
months ahead. Please don't try and defend any of these companies, as that
will only lead others to think that you might work for them. Simply
understand that in no way am I saying that this practice is widespread, or
that all companies practice serial number swapping, just that it is being
done and for the wrong reasons, as it has now happened to me. Sure you can
say you see all kinds of crap in newsgroups and this post is no different,
but I challenge you to have an open mind in this particular case.

I know this post may receive an avalanche of responses; I will do my best
to
respond to as many as I can over the weeks and months ahead. However, I
will
do my best to avoid answering replies that are non constructive who's
objective is to cause friction within our group, to dumb-me-down, or try
to
deny that this kind of practice does not happen and thus could not of
possibly happened to me, especially with Motorola. I say unto you, THINK
AGAIN.


Thank you for your valuable time and good luck in your ID repair test!

Jim

I haven't sent any phones to Motorola for repair.

I own a 2-way radio repair shop and have sent several portable radios
(walkie-talkies), mobile radios and pagers in for repair.

I always get the same radio back, I know this because I read the serial
number with the Motorola programming software, it's burnt into the codeplug.

On some of the radios they have replaced the entire circuit board and they
burn the same serial number into the codeplug.

They do have the capability of changing the serial numbers (I do not) with
their software, but I have never had a problem with a radio repaired by
Motorola.

They are returned in the original cases, unless the case is damaged.

Hope this helps.
bamp


  #3  
Old December 2nd 04, 05:22 AM
Al Klein
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 1 Dec 2004 20:18:04 -0600, "bamp" bampatcenturyteldotnet
said in alt.cellular.motorola:

I haven't sent any phones to Motorola for repair.

I own a 2-way radio repair shop and have sent several portable radios
(walkie-talkies), mobile radios and pagers in for repair.

I always get the same radio back, I know this because I read the serial
number with the Motorola programming software, it's burnt into the codeplug.

On some of the radios they have replaced the entire circuit board and they
burn the same serial number into the codeplug.

They do have the capability of changing the serial numbers (I do not) with
their software, but I have never had a problem with a radio repaired by
Motorola.

They are returned in the original cases, unless the case is damaged.

Hope this helps.


It helps normal people, but I doubt it'll satisfy any conspiracy nut
reading it.
  #4  
Old December 2nd 04, 04:03 PM
Thomas M. Goethe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Actually, I strongly suspect that commercial and government quality
two-way gear gets a better level of service than the typical c-phone
consumer, though I remember the manager of the Motorola service center in
Tampa frying my $3,500 (1987 dollars) MX-330 handheld by popping it open to
show me a component feeling the need to take off the battery.


--
Thomas M. Goethe

"Al Klein" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 1 Dec 2004 20:18:04 -0600, "bamp" bampatcenturyteldotnet
said in alt.cellular.motorola:

I haven't sent any phones to Motorola for repair.

I own a 2-way radio repair shop and have sent several portable radios
(walkie-talkies), mobile radios and pagers in for repair.

I always get the same radio back, I know this because I read the serial
number with the Motorola programming software, it's burnt into the
codeplug.

On some of the radios they have replaced the entire circuit board and they
burn the same serial number into the codeplug.

They do have the capability of changing the serial numbers (I do not) with
their software, but I have never had a problem with a radio repaired by
Motorola.

They are returned in the original cases, unless the case is damaged.

Hope this helps.


It helps normal people, but I doubt it'll satisfy any conspiracy nut
reading it.



  #5  
Old December 3rd 04, 04:38 AM
Al Klein
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 10:03:37 -0500, "Thomas M. Goethe"
said in alt.cellular.motorola:

Actually, I strongly suspect that commercial and government quality
two-way gear gets a better level of service than the typical c-phone
consumer, though I remember the manager of the Motorola service center in
Tampa frying my $3,500 (1987 dollars) MX-330 handheld by popping it open to
show me a component feeling the need to take off the battery.


Now there's a guy who would make me feel very comfortable about
bringing my equipment to his shop for repair - NOT!
  #6  
Old December 3rd 04, 01:33 PM
Thomas M. Goethe
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Oops, that was supposed to say WITHOUT taking off the battery. The only
funny part was when the tech who I usually dealt with told me later that
they always kept him away from the equipment. Apparently he got into
management in the 60's and had actually been really good with that era
two-way mobiles, but was clueless about anything handheld or newer than
1980.

Anyway, I still got better service on that stuff than I have ever been
able to get with a c-phone.


--
Thomas M. Goethe

"Al Klein" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 10:03:37 -0500, "Thomas M. Goethe"
said in alt.cellular.motorola:

Actually, I strongly suspect that commercial and government quality
two-way gear gets a better level of service than the typical c-phone
consumer, though I remember the manager of the Motorola service center in
Tampa frying my $3,500 (1987 dollars) MX-330 handheld by popping it open
to
show me a component feeling the need to take off the battery.


Now there's a guy who would make me feel very comfortable about
bringing my equipment to his shop for repair - NOT!



  #7  
Old December 4th 04, 03:04 AM
Al Klein
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 3 Dec 2004 07:33:12 -0500, "Thomas M. Goethe"
said in alt.cellular.motorola:

Oops, that was supposed to say WITHOUT taking off the battery. The only
funny part was when the tech who I usually dealt with told me later that
they always kept him away from the equipment. Apparently he got into
management in the 60's and had actually been really good with that era
two-way mobiles, but was clueless about anything handheld or newer than
1980.


I was pretty good with U43s and 44s, 180s, etc., too. Problem is that
I can't SEE the components in the more modern stuff.

Anyway, I still got better service on that stuff than I have ever been
able to get with a c-phone.


Cell phones are designed to be expendable - use one for a year, then
toss it and get something newer and fancier. I don't know how good
that idea is, but that's how it's supposed to work.
 




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