A mobile phone forum. Mobile-Forum

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Mobile-Forum forum » General mobile phone forums » General
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 21st 16, 06:47 AM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Horace Algier
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?
http://i.cubeupload.com/zNtJ10.png

Just about monthly, I reset my Android phone to factory defaults, where I
re-install my apps from auto-archived APKs without creating a Google Play
account.

The first app installed from an APK outside of Google Play causes this
setting to pop up: http://i.cubeupload.com/qaqp8e.png
"Install blocked: For security, your device is set to block installation
of applications not obtained from Google Play"

Pressing the "Settings" button brings you to the "Unknown sources" box:
http://i.cubeupload.com/66kdAe.png

Which says:
"Unknown sources: Your device and personal data are more vulnerable to
attack by applications from unknown sources. You agree that you are solely
responsible for any damage to your device or loss of data that may result
from using these applications."
[x]Allow initial installation only === what does this mean?

After you press "OK" to the "Unknown sources" box, you get the question:
http://i.cubeupload.com/zNtJ10.png
"Google may regularly check installed apps for potentially harmful
behavior."

The application will install whether you "Decline" or "Accept":
http://i.cubeupload.com/ObXiPQ.png

So, the main question is simply whether you allow Google to "regularly
check installed apps"?

In addition, the dialog says "Learn more in Google Settings Verify apps",
but I don't seem to have that "verify apps" settings in "my" Google
Settings.

Here's what I do have in my Google Settings:

*(Google Settings)*
Google+, Location, Search, Ads, Android Device Manager
http://i.cubeupload.com/AuoxUM.png

(Google location settings)*
*Access location
[ ]Let Google apps use this phone's location any time the device is on?
http://i.cubeupload.com/dbsuhF.png

*(Privacy & accounts)*
[ ] Safesearch is active or not active?
http://i.cubeupload.com/k8Cvez.png

*(Google Ads)*
Enable Tailored Ads by Google in Apps
[ ] Choose whether to see interest-based Ads by Google in non-Google apps.
http://i.cubeupload.com/siQsa9.png

*(Android Device Manager)*
[ ] If you lose your device, you can lock or erase it with ADM?
http://i.cubeupload.com/LjzN88.png (Android Device Manager)

My question:
Q: What do *you* have in *your* Google Settings for allowing Google to
"regularly check installed apps"?
  #2  
Old September 22nd 16, 08:13 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Arno Welzel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on yourapps?

Horace Algier schrieb am 2016-09-21 um 07:47:

Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?
http://i.cubeupload.com/zNtJ10.png

Just about monthly, I reset my Android phone to factory defaults, where I
re-install my apps from auto-archived APKs without creating a Google Play
account.


And usually most people don't do this.

EOD


--
Arno Welzel
https://arnowelzel.de
http://de-rec-fahrrad.de
http://fahrradzukunft.de
  #3  
Old September 22nd 16, 11:43 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Horace Algiers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

On Thu, 22 Sep 2016 21:13:35 +0200, Arno Welzel wrote:

Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?
http://i.cubeupload.com/zNtJ10.png

Just about monthly, I reset my Android phone to factory defaults, where I
re-install my apps from auto-archived APKs without creating a Google Play
account.


And usually most people don't do this.


Which are you saying most people don't do?
a. Declining or accepting Google checking of the apps?
b. Installing apps from previously-saved APKs
  #4  
Old September 23rd 16, 05:28 AM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
tlvp[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 820
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

On Thu, 22 Sep 2016 22:43:49 +0000 (UTC), Horace Algiers wrote:

On Thu, 22 Sep 2016 21:13:35 +0200, Arno Welzel wrote:

Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?
http://i.cubeupload.com/zNtJ10.png

Just about monthly, I reset my Android phone to factory defaults, where I
re-install my apps from auto-archived APKs without creating a Google Play
account.


And usually most people don't do this.


Which are you saying most people don't do?
a. Declining or accepting Google checking of the apps?
b. Installing apps from previously-saved APKs


My guess: he's apt to be saying most people don't reset their phones (or
anything else, forf that matter) to factory defaults every month or so,
with concomitant need to re-install all apps and re-establish all
settings/options/preferences. YMMV, of course.

Cheers, -- tlvp
--
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP.
  #5  
Old September 23rd 16, 07:24 AM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Arno Welzel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on yourapps?

Horace Algiers schrieb am 2016-09-23 um 00:43:

On Thu, 22 Sep 2016 21:13:35 +0200, Arno Welzel wrote:

Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?
http://i.cubeupload.com/zNtJ10.png

Just about monthly, I reset my Android phone to factory defaults, where I
re-install my apps from auto-archived APKs without creating a Google Play
account.


And usually most people don't do this.


Which are you saying most people don't do?
a. Declining or accepting Google checking of the apps?
b. Installing apps from previously-saved APKs


None of the above. I talk about this:

"Just about monthly, I reset my Android phone to factory defaults, where
I re-install my apps from auto-archived APKs without creating a Google
Play account."


--
Arno Welzel
https://arnowelzel.de
http://de-rec-fahrrad.de
http://fahrradzukunft.de
  #6  
Old September 23rd 16, 02:56 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Horace Algiers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

On Fri, 23 Sep 2016 00:28:49 -0400, tlvp wrote:

My guess: he's apt to be saying most people don't reset their phones (or
anything else, forf that matter) to factory defaults every month or so,
with concomitant need to re-install all apps and re-establish all
settings/options/preferences. YMMV, of course


Thanks for that clarification becuase I wasn't sure which it was.

BTW, rebuilding a phone back to normal is trivially easy if you *plan*
ahead, just like rebuilding the OS on a desktop is easy if you plan ahead.

For example, on a desktop, I *always* plan ahead by...
a. Storing all installers in a given hierarchy
b. Installing all programs in (a copy of) the same given hieararchy
c. Using all menus in (another copy of) the same given hierarchy

For example:
c:\data\software\{the hierarchy} for the installers
c:\apps\{the hierarchy} for the programs
c:\data\menu\{the hierarchary) for the menus

To re-install the user's data and apps is trivial since all I need to do is
copy the data hierarchy to a safe place and then re-install, one by one,
simply by going down the installer hierarchy.

It's even *easier* on a cellphone, simply because all the APKs are and data
are *automatically* saved on Android on the external flash card (if you set
it up correctly), so I already have a *saved* copy of everything that is
unaffected by a factory reset!

The Android reset procedure doesn't require huge Internet mainframe
servers, and it doesn't have *any* pain whatsoever associated with it.

Just click on the APKs, one by one, to set up the cellphone, and without
need of Internet or a computer with hundreds upon hundreds upon hundreds of
megabytes of bloatware, you're set up in minutes.

1. You simply make a hierarchy of empty placeholder folders, e.g.,
Desktop: {map, people, browser, buy, pic, audio, video, wifi, etc.}
For example, here is my /extSdCard/data/software/video hierarchy:
http://i.cubeupload.com/oWPTX3.png

NOTE: Multiple version of the same app from any repository can easily be
saved, installed, tested, and the best one for your needs finally installed
(whatever version you like best, all without any repositories being
installed, least of all Google Play!

2. When you install the app, the icon goes visibly wherever you want it to
so, which, in this case, is in the top-left corner as shown here.
http://i.cubeupload.com/8Uvf6v.png

3. You simply slide the app icon into the placeholder folders as shown
he
http://i.cubeupload.com/508V7q.png

Even with setting up the app, it takes almost no time whatsoever to
reconfigure an Android device, without the need of mainframe computers and
home desktops - and the best part of this is that you always can use *any
version* of the app that works with your operating system.

You can have app APKs from any number of outside repositories, and you
don't even need a Google Play account to re-install everything!

Any version of the app - and - any version of the operating system that
works with your hardware.

Of course, on iOS, that's all *impossible*; iOS itself, as we've proven
many times, is incapable of doing the *simplest* things, such as installing
older versions even *with* the help of mainframe computers on the net and
powerful desktops - and - worse - iOS is extremely limited itself, as it
can't do *any* of this without the huge assistance of mainframe computers
on the Internet and/or desktop computers (to do something as simple as
restore a personal backup!).

PS: I tapped on each screenshot to bluetooth them to my laptop while I was
writing this note. iOS is so limited, even *that* simple task is impossible
on iOS!
  #7  
Old September 23rd 16, 03:19 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
nospam[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,163
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

In article , Horace Algiers
wrote:


My guess: he's apt to be saying most people don't reset their phones (or
anything else, forf that matter) to factory defaults every month or so,
with concomitant need to re-install all apps and re-establish all
settings/options/preferences. YMMV, of course


Thanks for that clarification becuase I wasn't sure which it was.

BTW, rebuilding a phone back to normal is trivially easy if you *plan*
ahead, just like rebuilding the OS on a desktop is easy if you plan ahead.


it may be 'trivially easy' conceptually, but it's very time consuming
(especially with higher capacity devices) and completely pointless to
do it monthly or even yearly.

For example, on a desktop, I *always* plan ahead by...
a. Storing all installers in a given hierarchy
b. Installing all programs in (a copy of) the same given hieararchy
c. Using all menus in (another copy of) the same given hierarchy

For example:
c:\data\software\{the hierarchy} for the installers
c:\apps\{the hierarchy} for the programs
c:\data\menu\{the hierarchary) for the menus

To re-install the user's data and apps is trivial since all I need to do is
copy the data hierarchy to a safe place and then re-install, one by one,
simply by going down the installer hierarchy.

It's even *easier* on a cellphone, simply because all the APKs are and data
are *automatically* saved on Android on the external flash card (if you set
it up correctly), so I already have a *saved* copy of everything that is
unaffected by a factory reset!

The Android reset procedure doesn't require huge Internet mainframe
servers, and it doesn't have *any* pain whatsoever associated with it.

Just click on the APKs, one by one, to set up the cellphone, and without
need of Internet or a computer with hundreds upon hundreds upon hundreds of
megabytes of bloatware, you're set up in minutes.

1. You simply make a hierarchy of empty placeholder folders, e.g.,
Desktop: {map, people, browser, buy, pic, audio, video, wifi, etc.}
For example, here is my /extSdCard/data/software/video hierarchy:
http://i.cubeupload.com/oWPTX3.png

NOTE: Multiple version of the same app from any repository can easily be
saved, installed, tested, and the best one for your needs finally installed
(whatever version you like best, all without any repositories being
installed, least of all Google Play!

2. When you install the app, the icon goes visibly wherever you want it to
so, which, in this case, is in the top-left corner as shown here.
http://i.cubeupload.com/8Uvf6v.png

3. You simply slide the app icon into the placeholder folders as shown
he
http://i.cubeupload.com/508V7q.png

Even with setting up the app, it takes almost no time whatsoever to
reconfigure an Android device, without the need of mainframe computers and
home desktops - and the best part of this is that you always can use *any
version* of the app that works with your operating system.


bull****. it's actually very time consuming to restore a device no
matter what it is, particularly if you're doing it manually.

You can have app APKs from any number of outside repositories, and you
don't even need a Google Play account to re-install everything!

Any version of the app - and - any version of the operating system that
works with your hardware.

Of course, on iOS, that's all *impossible*; iOS itself, as we've proven
many times, is incapable of doing the *simplest* things, such as installing
older versions even *with* the help of mainframe computers on the net and
powerful desktops - and - worse - iOS is extremely limited itself, as it
can't do *any* of this without the huge assistance of mainframe computers
on the Internet and/or desktop computers (to do something as simple as
restore a personal backup!).


trolling again, and as usual, complete nonsense.

it's actually very easy to restore an ios device from a backup, so easy
that it's just a button click and without needing any 'mainframe
computers on the net'.

PS: I tapped on each screenshot to bluetooth them to my laptop while I was
writing this note. iOS is so limited, even *that* simple task is impossible
on iOS!


more trolling.

on ios, tapping a screenshot will send it via wifi, which is over 100x
faster than bluetooth.
  #8  
Old September 23rd 16, 05:21 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Horace Algiers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

On Fri, 23 Sep 2016 10:19:59 -0400, nospam wrote:

it may be 'trivially easy' conceptually, but it's very time consuming
(especially with higher capacity devices) and completely pointless to
do it monthly or even yearly.


In the simplest sense, your "concept" is similar to that of an automatic
transmission - where you default on thinking - whereas my concept is akin
to the manual transmission - which - sure - it's "more work" but the
results are more satisfyingly tuned to my needs.

Even with setting up the app, it takes almost no time whatsoever to
reconfigure an Android device, without the need of mainframe computers and
home desktops - and the best part of this is that you always can use *any
version* of the app that works with your operating system.


bull****. it's actually very time consuming to restore a device no
matter what it is, particularly if you're doing it manually.


Well, let's look at it the way Jolly Roger looks at jailbreaking.

To *him*, since he's done it so many times, it takes "5 minutes".
To "me", it would take 10x that and then add an order of magnitude.

Likewise, I've re-installed so many operating systems, that it does only
take me a short while (maybe an hour, if that) to set up the system the way
I want it set up.

Each time, of course, I *explore* more settings, and I *test* different
apps and versions, and I *experiment* with disabling of permissions.

For example, I disabled location permission on *all* the apps that
requested it (that didn't need it).

For example, *why* does ES File Explorer need location access?
http://i.cubeupload.com/HH2sfG.png

Why does a WiFi Analyzer need location access?
http://i.cubeupload.com/PKxm2Z.png

Why does the T-Mobile carrier-iq "System Manager Application" need it?
http://i.cubeupload.com/puQjf5.png

Why does a stinkin' clock need location access?
http://i.cubeupload.com/mAHrrA.png

Or the Contacts app, for heaven's sake?
http://i.cubeupload.com/QDEOwe.png

The list goes on and on and on.
My "experiment" is to see if anything bad happens.
So far, after two days, nothing bad has happened yet.

it's actually very easy to restore an ios device from a backup, so easy
that it's just a button click and without needing any 'mainframe
computers on the net'.


I notice how you cleverly danced around the fact that it's *impossible* to
restore iOS without needing a *SECOND* computer (of any sort, net or no
net), whereas it's trivial do restore an Android system *without* anything
but the Android device itself.

That's only one of very many things that Android can do, all by itself,
that the more primitive and limited iOS can't hope to accomplish all by
itself.

on ios, tapping a screenshot will send it via wifi, which is over 100x
faster than bluetooth.


Which fails every time when you don't have a network established, which
means you can't do it when you're away from your established network.

So, again, yet another of many things Android does that the primitive and
limited iOS can't even hope to accomplish simply because of the limitations
of the software (the hardware is fine - it's the software that is limited
by Apple as to what it can do).
  #9  
Old September 23rd 16, 06:04 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
nospam[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,163
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

In article , Horace Algiers
wrote:

Even with setting up the app, it takes almost no time whatsoever to
reconfigure an Android device, without the need of mainframe computers and
home desktops - and the best part of this is that you always can use *any
version* of the app that works with your operating system.


bull****. it's actually very time consuming to restore a device no
matter what it is, particularly if you're doing it manually.


Well, let's look at it the way Jolly Roger looks at jailbreaking.

To *him*, since he's done it so many times, it takes "5 minutes".
To "me", it would take 10x that and then add an order of magnitude.


that's because you'e completely inept at doing the simplest things and
you have an odd way of saying two orders of magnitude (because you
haven't a ****ing clue what you're talking about).

Likewise, I've re-installed so many operating systems, that it does only
take me a short while (maybe an hour, if that) to set up the system the way
I want it set up.


an hour completely wasted.

and with ios, even if you do repeatedly restore for no reason, as you
do with android, the difference is you don't have to babysit the
process. click restore and let it do its thing while you go off and do
something *else*.

Each time, of course, I *explore* more settings, and I *test* different
apps and versions, and I *experiment* with disabling of permissions.


there's no need to wipe/restore to experiment with different apps and
versions or for changing permissions.

you make even the simplest things a total cluster****.

For example, I disabled location permission on *all* the apps that
requested it (that didn't need it).

For example, *why* does ES File Explorer need location access?
http://i.cubeupload.com/HH2sfG.png

Why does a WiFi Analyzer need location access?
http://i.cubeupload.com/PKxm2Z.png

Why does the T-Mobile carrier-iq "System Manager Application" need it?
http://i.cubeupload.com/puQjf5.png

Why does a stinkin' clock need location access?
http://i.cubeupload.com/mAHrrA.png

Or the Contacts app, for heaven's sake?
http://i.cubeupload.com/QDEOwe.png

The list goes on and on and on.


that it does, but you really meant to say the trolling goes on and on
and on.

My "experiment" is to see if anything bad happens.
So far, after two days, nothing bad has happened yet.


bummer. if only something would.

it's actually very easy to restore an ios device from a backup, so easy
that it's just a button click and without needing any 'mainframe
computers on the net'.


I notice how you cleverly danced around the fact that it's *impossible* to
restore iOS without needing a *SECOND* computer (of any sort, net or no
net), whereas it's trivial do restore an Android system *without* anything
but the Android device itself.


once again, you're lying.

a backup has to be somewhere *other* than the device itself, otherwise
it's not a backup.

in your case, the backup is kept on sd cards, but in piecemeal form
requiring you have to manually restore each app individually (see quote
below).

on an ios device, you tap restore and let the computer do the work
*for* you. the backup can either be in the cloud (convenient) or on a
computer (faster).

That's only one of very many things that Android can do, all by itself,
that the more primitive and limited iOS can't hope to accomplish all by
itself.


you're lying again. it's absolutely *not* 'all by itself'.

In article , Horace Algiers
wrote:
A couple of days ago, when I factory reset Android 4.3 and re-installed all
my apps, one by one, from APKs, I decided to turn off location access for
all but the map apps.


if you're reinstalling apps *one* *by* *one* and checking permissions
as you go, then it's *not* 'only one of very many things that Android
can do, all by itself'. it's *you* who is doing it, the hard way.

meanwhile on ios, it really does restore everything (and i do mean
everything) all by itself, with just a tap.

on ios, tapping a screenshot will send it via wifi, which is over 100x
faster than bluetooth.


Which fails every time when you don't have a network established, which
means you can't do it when you're away from your established network.


wrong, yet again

you've been told thousands of times that *no* existing network is
needed.

the two devices set up their own network automatically, without any
user configuration necessary, even on a deserted island totally off the
grid.

to the user, it's still a couple of taps, just as it would be with
bluetooth, but the actual transfer is way the **** faster because it's
over wifi.

So, again, yet another of many things Android does that the primitive and
limited iOS can't even hope to accomplish simply because of the limitations
of the software (the hardware is fine - it's the software that is limited
by Apple as to what it can do).


more rubbish.
  #10  
Old September 24th 16, 12:22 AM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Horace Algiers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default Do you "Decline" or "Accept" Google regularly checking on your apps?

On Fri, 23 Sep 2016 15:54:31 -0500, joe wrote:

If you are going to use a car comparison, then what you are
doing is more like rebuilding the engine every month.


If you know cars, and if you know engines, then what I'm doing is more akin
to "blueprinting" the engine than merely rebuilding it.

And, my constant tweaking of hundreds of settings a month is akin to using
a manual transmission instead of an automatic (where many people just take
the defaults handed to them for everything).

Since iOS has the engine bay welded shut, iOS users have no possibility of
blueprinting the engine, nor choosing which gear they'll be in. . All they
can do is point the thing.

Worse, they need a tow truck standing by with hundrds upon hundreds of
megabytes of bloatware just to change a tire, since, by their own
admission, iOS can't even do the *simplest* of things without that desktop
and Internet mainframe tow truck following them everywhere they go.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SPRINT = a "meltdown," a "miserable performance" and a "disaster" -shares plunged 25.2 percent 4phun Cingular 239 February 4th 08 11:44 PM
SPRINT = a "meltdown," a "miserable performance" and a "disaster" -shares plunged 25.2 percent 4phun AT&T Wireless 123 February 4th 08 07:10 PM
SPRINT = a "meltdown," a "miserable performance" and a "disaster" - shares plunged 25.2 percent John Navas Sprint 118 February 4th 08 07:10 PM
SPRINT = a "meltdown," a "miserable performance" and a "disaster" -shares plunged 25.2 percent 4phun Verizon 125 February 4th 08 07:10 PM
need "super ruggedized case" or "hard clamshell quick-open" casefor my e815, do they exist? dave Motorola 3 July 13th 06 04:59 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 Mobile-Forum.
The comments are property of their posters.