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Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?



 
 
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  #101  
Old September 28th 16, 09:41 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Horace Algier
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?

On Wed, 28 Sep 2016 11:25:40 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Anyway, these are mostly overlays for Google Earth showing the fire
perimeter and progression:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/Lockheed-Fire/
This is the last one of the series:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/Lockheed-Fire/CA-CZU-E43J%20Lockheed%208-19-2009%202354.kmz
If you don't have Google Earth, it looks something like this when
rotated:
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/Lockheed-Fire/2009-08-21_Lockheed-Fire-Controlled-Burn.jpg
Very useful if you want a clue how close the fire is to your home or
if it's safe to return.


Thanks for that last map, as I'm not using Google Earth at the moment (it
keeps crashing on Linux).

As you noted, we're all passing maps back and forth, but your map is nicely
detailed, because what matters to us is mostly the area burned, the area
threatened, the area evacuated, and the roads closed.

If evacuated, the evacuation route and the holding centers are of prime
importance. We have had a ton of the blue and white signs going up in the
neighborhood, so, they're getting us ready as we type.

Here is a great picture taken from an airplane, of the mushroom cloud I saw
on the first day, but from a far better angle than I saw it then.
http://i.cubeupload.com/1N0PDv.jpg
  #102  
Old September 29th 16, 03:38 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Jeff Liebermann[_2_]
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Posts: 421
Default Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?

On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 20:39:26 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

There are also some cheats, such as AT&T. Their solution is to assume
that anyone calling 911 is in a vehicle. This is a good assumption
based on caller statistics. In California, when you call 911, you
don't get the local 911 PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point). You get
the Highway Patrol. So, AT&T decided to fudge to location to coincide
with highways and roadways, thus improving their "accuracy". That has
failed miserably when someone called 911 from a baseball field, that
had no address, and where the AGPS kluge located them at the nearest
major roadway, about 1/2 mile away.


This is what happens thanks to such kludges in GPS location:
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-city-settlements-20160928-snap-story.html
"Witnesses called 911 and told a dispatcher paramedics were
needed at the school’s soccer field. However, without an
exact address, the dispatcher said he was unable to send
help. Eventually an ambulance was dispatched to the wrong
address, according to court papers.
It ultimately took paramedics nearly 20 minutes to reach
the teen, according to the family’s lawsuit."

Note that the witnesses were calling from the soccer field, where a
GPS location from the cell phones should have produced a usable
Lat-Long location. After all, soccer fields are in the open, where
the GPS has a good view of the sky. Yet, the dispatcher was
apparently trying to obtain a non-existent physical address from the
callers, instead of using GPS location. I don't know exactly why, but
my guess(tm) is that past history of using cell phone GPS location by
the department probably produced less than useful results. After such
incidents, it's really difficult for me to swallow the pitch line that
more accurate E911 and NG911 location information is specifically for
emergency services instead of tracking ones movements.

Notice that the article continues:
"Since then, the LAFD has changed its dispatch system to
include addresses for all schools within the city of
Los Angeles, according to a department spokesman."
which again suggests that the 911 dispatchers consider a callers
physical street address more accurate and more accurate than a GPS
location from a cell phone. All this confirms what I've suspected for
a long time, that PSAPs (public safety answering points) do not use
GPS cell phone location information.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #103  
Old September 29th 16, 04:16 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
danny burstein
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Posts: 166
Default Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?

On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 20:39:26 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

There are also some cheats, such as AT&T. Their solution is to assume
that anyone calling 911 is in a vehicle. This is a good assumption
based on caller statistics. In California, when you call 911, you
don't get the local 911 PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point). You get
the Highway Patrol.


WTF? That made sense back in 1985 but now?

--
__________________________________________________ ___
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key

[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
  #104  
Old September 29th 16, 05:07 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Jeff Liebermann[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 421
Default Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?

On Thu, 29 Sep 2016 15:16:02 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein
wrote:

On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 20:39:26 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

There are also some cheats, such as AT&T. Their solution is to assume
that anyone calling 911 is in a vehicle. This is a good assumption
based on caller statistics. In California, when you call 911, you
don't get the local 911 PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point). You get
the Highway Patrol.


WTF? That made sense back in 1985 but now?


Which part of what I wrote doesn't make sense today?

This might help explain why mobile 911 calls go to the CHP:
http://www.emergencymgmt.com/safety/California-Analyzes-Cell-Phone-911-Project-Red.html
If you're not in California, the situation might be different.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #105  
Old October 1st 16, 03:28 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Carlos E.R.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't needit?

On 2016-09-28 15:17, Dave Higton wrote:
In message
"Carlos E.R." wrote:

On 2016-09-26 20:17, Frank Slootweg wrote:
Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:24:40 +0200, "Carlos E.R."
wrote:

IIRC, VoIp doesn't support emergency calls.

Let me assure you that it does. However, it's not exactly in any of
the maze of acronyms and protocols used by VoIP. E911 is a service
provided by the VoIP service provider.

Please note that Carlos talks about "emergency calls", while you talk
about (E)911. 911 is a US (only? mainly?) thing. Other systems, for
example the European one, are quite different.

[...]


Well, it is something I read on the notes from some VoIp providers that
I looked. Maybe things have changed, or they are different in the USA.
One reason could be that VoIp was not considered reliable enough, it did
not pass the testing - as compared to POTS, I suppose.


I suggest you research NG911 (Next Generation 911).


It would be no use to me. Here it is 112.

--
Cheers, Carlos.
  #106  
Old October 1st 16, 08:56 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.cellular,alt.internet.wireless
Dave Higton[_2_]
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Posts: 4
Default Do you turn off "location access" in all the apps that don't need it?

In message
"Carlos E.R." wrote:

On 2016-09-28 15:17, Dave Higton wrote:
In message
"Carlos E.R." wrote:

On 2016-09-26 20:17, Frank Slootweg wrote:
Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 26 Sep 2016 16:24:40 +0200, "Carlos E.R."
wrote:

IIRC, VoIp doesn't support emergency calls.

Let me assure you that it does. However, it's not exactly in any of
the maze of acronyms and protocols used by VoIP. E911 is a service
provided by the VoIP service provider.

Please note that Carlos talks about "emergency calls", while you talk
about (E)911. 911 is a US (only? mainly?) thing. Other systems, for
example the European one, are quite different.

[...]

Well, it is something I read on the notes from some VoIp providers that
I looked. Maybe things have changed, or they are different in the USA.
One reason could be that VoIp was not considered reliable enough, it did
not pass the testing - as compared to POTS, I suppose.


I suggest you research NG911 (Next Generation 911).


It would be no use to me. Here it is 112.


I meant that researching NG911 would demonstrate clearly to you that
VoIP is considered reliable enough in the USA.

As for 112, you can expect that to follow what the USA does, to a
large extent, some way down the road.

Dave
 




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