A mobile phone forum. Mobile-Forum

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Mobile-Forum forum » Airtime providers » AT&T Wireless
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

iPhone share of U.S. traffic hits 69%



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #261  
Old July 29th 09, 04:20 AM posted to alt.cellular.attws,alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.mac.advocacy
chingding123
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default iPhone share of U.S. traffic hits 69%

On Jun 29, 11:26*am, ZnU wrote:
In article ,
*Jeff Liebermann wrote:



On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 17:28:03 -0400, ZnU wrote:


In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:


Yep. *No sane person would buy an iPhone for legitimate reasons.I
actually believe that.


You're insane.


Yeah, probably true. *As a Verizon customer and Windoze user, one has
to be insane to post my opinions in aMacadvocacy newsgroup. However,
it's not my fault. *Blame John Navas for his selection of groups in
the original posting.


Oh wait.... I have aMacG4 Cube in the office running OS/X 11.3. *I
guess that qualifies me as aMacuser and therefore entitled to voice
an opinion.


The phone has better hardware specs than practically any
other smart phone on the market, a richer collection of third-party
apps, better designed software, and integrates with the world's most
popular digital media distribution platform... you don't think any of
those are legitimate reasons to buy it?


Full disclosu *In a past life, I played RF designer but never
designed a cell phone. *The closest I came was accessories for IMTS
phones and some trunking systems.


I'm not sure what parts of the hardware you find superior, but if
you're referring to the RF sections, the typical Blackberry (Curve) is
somewhat better.


I find the iPhone to be fairly typical hardware and the result of some
necessary compromises. *The original version had an HSDPA (3G) modem,
but couldn't pass some FCC specs (occupied bandwidth or emission
bandwidth), so it was released with only an EDGE modem.


Source?

Rumor has it that the non-removable battery was used because the
original battery was too small to run the iPhone all day. *To fit a
larger battery, the hardware involved in battery connections and
mounting were removed.


Non-removable batteries provide better battery life. This is not
anything anyone, particularly Apple, has attempted to make a secret of.



Wi-Fi range on both the iPhone and iPod Touch are very limited due to
an undersized antenna and limited RF power (and possibly limited
sensitivity). *The FCC test specs shows 9 to 11dBm power output into
1.2dBi gain antenna.
https://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/prod/oet/f....cgi?attachmen....
1449&native_or_pdf=pdf
The typical laptop miniPCI card will do about 30dBm into about 2dbi.
My Acer Aspire One will do about 100ft to my office access point. *My
iPod Touch will barely go 15ft. *Oddly, a friends 1G (first
generation) iPod Touch version will go perhaps 30ft.


SAR for the 3G is 1.4 watts/kg, which is on the high end probably due
to reflections from the metal back. *(1.6w/kg is the max for Canada).
The first model and the 3G S models were all lower.
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6602_7-6258775-11.html?tag=rb_content;rb...
FCC data for the 3G:
https://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/...Report.cfm?mod....
ts&RequestTimeout=500&calledFromFrame=N&applicatio n_id=227268&fcc_id=%27BCGA12
41%27
I've found that the range on the iPhone is typical of phones with
internal antennas, but less than those with external projecting
antennas. *I haven't done any bench testing, beyond ripping apart
several iPod Touch PDA's to replace the battery. *What a PITA.


In practice, the iPhone's reception is pretty good. I was thinking more
of its large number of on-board sensors (which enable a lot of
interesting new interaction capabilities), its powerful processor and
GPU, its relatively large amount of RAM and flash, and its large
high-resolution screen.

Of course, the i/o connector, charger, and sync cables are essentially
proprietary. *It wouldn't do to have used a common 5 pin mini-USB
connector.


Not unless you've figured out how to get one to carry analog video,
audio, and various sorts of control signals, no.

Fortunately, the cable used happens to be the same one Apple has used
with every iPod made in the last half decade or something, so it's
pretty easy to find one. Hell, if you're at a friend's house without a
charger, they probably have one.

Well, at least they got the earphone jack correct.


I'm not sure if you include mechanical construction in your "better
hardware specs". *If you've ever tried to replace the battery
yourself, you'll wonder if it was designed to be repaired. *Probably
not.


Few tiny consumer electronics devices are. This is a natural consequence
of a) increasing miniaturization and b) the relative decline in cost of
initial manufacturing vs. repair (primarily as a consequence of the
former being easier to automate).

I've bid on several broken iPod Touch units on eBay (without success).
Apparently broken displays and water damage are common.


I would be astounded if these weren't the two most common failure modes
for virtually every phone.

[snip]

Rather than lecture on the subject of merchandising and motivational
marketing, perhaps I can offer some reading material on why people buy
and do things. *There's plenty of psychology and magic involved in
product design. *Any of the old Wilson Bryan Key books on subliminals
in advertising is a good and entertaining start. *The bottom line is
that we are motivated by much more than just "productivity".


This whole thing is a strawman, given that absolutely nobody has claimed
everyone buys the iPhone as a productivity device.

Mind you, I run a small business and use mine rather extensively in
conjunction with that. But the lack of a physical keyboard on the iPhone
is a rather dead giveaway that it's an "iPod phone", not a "e-mail
phone".

Second, you're completely overlooking user experience.


Nope. *I'm a user and I'm somewhat experienced. *I find the iPod Touch
and iPhone to be rather clumsy, feature limited, and awkward.


You're welcome to your opinion, but in this instance it puts you in the
extreme minority.

[snip]

Right. *My XV6700 has all the features I could ever want.
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/xv6700/XV6700.htm
It's all there and what's missing can be added as a WM5 application.
What's wrong is that they're all broken or badly implemented. *There
isn't a single feature on the phone that doesn't to something weird or
buggy. *I'll spare you the specifics. *Three firmware revisions later,
the phone is officially obsolete, so nothing will be fixed. *


If I'd known I was starting a discussion with someone who got excited
about putting a registry editor(!!!) on this phone, I really probably
wouldn't have bothered.

Your priorities are so far outside of mainstream consumer *or* business
user priorities that you might as well be posting from an alternative
universe.

[snip]

--
"The game of professional investment is intolerably boring and over-exacting to
anyone who is entirely exempt from the gambling instinct; whilst he who has it
must pay to this propensity the appropriate toll." -- John Maynard Keynes


This shouldn't surprise anyone. The some phenomenon exists in
politics.
Extremists always have far more in common with each other -- even when
they're on opposite sides -- than they do with reasonable people.
  #262  
Old July 29th 09, 12:10 PM posted to alt.cellular.attws,alt.internet.wireless,comp.sys.mac.advocacy
News[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,006
Default iPhone share of U.S. traffic hits 69%



chingding123 wrote:
On Jun 29, 11:26 am, ZnU wrote:
In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:



On Sun, 28 Jun 2009 17:28:03 -0400, ZnU wrote:
In article ,
Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Yep. No sane person would buy an iPhone for legitimate reasons.I
actually believe that.
You're insane.
Yeah, probably true. As a Verizon customer and Windoze user, one has
to be insane to post my opinions in aMacadvocacy newsgroup. However,
it's not my fault. Blame John Navas for his selection of groups in
the original posting.
Oh wait.... I have aMacG4 Cube in the office running OS/X 11.3. I
guess that qualifies me as aMacuser and therefore entitled to voice
an opinion.
The phone has better hardware specs than practically any
other smart phone on the market, a richer collection of third-party
apps, better designed software, and integrates with the world's most
popular digital media distribution platform... you don't think any of
those are legitimate reasons to buy it?
Full disclosu In a past life, I played RF designer but never
designed a cell phone. The closest I came was accessories for IMTS
phones and some trunking systems.
I'm not sure what parts of the hardware you find superior, but if
you're referring to the RF sections, the typical Blackberry (Curve) is
somewhat better.
I find the iPhone to be fairly typical hardware and the result of some
necessary compromises. The original version had an HSDPA (3G) modem,
but couldn't pass some FCC specs (occupied bandwidth or emission
bandwidth), so it was released with only an EDGE modem.

Source?

Rumor has it that the non-removable battery was used because the
original battery was too small to run the iPhone all day. To fit a
larger battery, the hardware involved in battery connections and
mounting were removed.

Non-removable batteries provide better battery life. This is not
anything anyone, particularly Apple, has attempted to make a secret of.



Wi-Fi range on both the iPhone and iPod Touch are very limited due to
an undersized antenna and limited RF power (and possibly limited
sensitivity). The FCC test specs shows 9 to 11dBm power output into
1.2dBi gain antenna.
https://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/prod/oet/f....cgi?attachmen...
1449&native_or_pdf=pdf
The typical laptop miniPCI card will do about 30dBm into about 2dbi.
My Acer Aspire One will do about 100ft to my office access point. My
iPod Touch will barely go 15ft. Oddly, a friends 1G (first
generation) iPod Touch version will go perhaps 30ft.
SAR for the 3G is 1.4 watts/kg, which is on the high end probably due
to reflections from the metal back. (1.6w/kg is the max for Canada).
The first model and the 3G S models were all lower.
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6602_7-6258775-11.html?tag=rb_content;rb...
FCC data for the 3G:
https://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/...Report.cfm?mod...
ts&RequestTimeout=500&calledFromFrame=N&applicatio n_id=227268&fcc_id=%27BCGA12
41%27
I've found that the range on the iPhone is typical of phones with
internal antennas, but less than those with external projecting
antennas. I haven't done any bench testing, beyond ripping apart
several iPod Touch PDA's to replace the battery. What a PITA.

In practice, the iPhone's reception is pretty good. I was thinking more
of its large number of on-board sensors (which enable a lot of
interesting new interaction capabilities), its powerful processor and
GPU, its relatively large amount of RAM and flash, and its large
high-resolution screen.

Of course, the i/o connector, charger, and sync cables are essentially
proprietary. It wouldn't do to have used a common 5 pin mini-USB
connector.

Not unless you've figured out how to get one to carry analog video,
audio, and various sorts of control signals, no.

Fortunately, the cable used happens to be the same one Apple has used
with every iPod made in the last half decade or something, so it's
pretty easy to find one. Hell, if you're at a friend's house without a
charger, they probably have one.

Well, at least they got the earphone jack correct.
I'm not sure if you include mechanical construction in your "better
hardware specs". If you've ever tried to replace the battery
yourself, you'll wonder if it was designed to be repaired. Probably
not.

Few tiny consumer electronics devices are. This is a natural consequence
of a) increasing miniaturization and b) the relative decline in cost of
initial manufacturing vs. repair (primarily as a consequence of the
former being easier to automate).

I've bid on several broken iPod Touch units on eBay (without success).
Apparently broken displays and water damage are common.

I would be astounded if these weren't the two most common failure modes
for virtually every phone.

[snip]

Rather than lecture on the subject of merchandising and motivational
marketing, perhaps I can offer some reading material on why people buy
and do things. There's plenty of psychology and magic involved in
product design. Any of the old Wilson Bryan Key books on subliminals
in advertising is a good and entertaining start. The bottom line is
that we are motivated by much more than just "productivity".

This whole thing is a strawman, given that absolutely nobody has claimed
everyone buys the iPhone as a productivity device.

Mind you, I run a small business and use mine rather extensively in
conjunction with that. But the lack of a physical keyboard on the iPhone
is a rather dead giveaway that it's an "iPod phone", not a "e-mail
phone".

Second, you're completely overlooking user experience.
Nope. I'm a user and I'm somewhat experienced. I find the iPod Touch
and iPhone to be rather clumsy, feature limited, and awkward.

You're welcome to your opinion, but in this instance it puts you in the
extreme minority.

[snip]

Right. My XV6700 has all the features I could ever want.
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/xv6700/XV6700.htm
It's all there and what's missing can be added as a WM5 application.
What's wrong is that they're all broken or badly implemented. There
isn't a single feature on the phone that doesn't to something weird or
buggy. I'll spare you the specifics. Three firmware revisions later,
the phone is officially obsolete, so nothing will be fixed.

If I'd known I was starting a discussion with someone who got excited
about putting a registry editor(!!!) on this phone, I really probably
wouldn't have bothered.

Your priorities are so far outside of mainstream consumer *or* business
user priorities that you might as well be posting from an alternative
universe.

[snip]

--
"The game of professional investment is intolerably boring and over-exacting to
anyone who is entirely exempt from the gambling instinct; whilst he who has it
must pay to this propensity the appropriate toll." -- John Maynard Keynes


This shouldn't surprise anyone. The some phenomenon exists in
politics.
Extremists always have far more in common with each other -- even when
they're on opposite sides -- than they do with reasonable people.



James Carville and Mary Matalin come to mind...
  #263  
Old September 23rd 13, 05:55 AM posted to alt.cellular.attws
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default iPhone share of U.S. traffic hits 69%

Pleased to introduced Ourselves as iCentre is a leading retailer committed to becoming the most loved and trusted marketplace on the web by offering superior shopping experience, rapid delivery, and stellar customer service. iCentre offers customers a peace of mind with lightning fast delivery and cutting-edge logistics.
We ensure that your online iPhone shopping experience at icentreindia.com is easy, enjoyable and absolutely secure. We also safeguard the privacy and integrity of customer data. .

http://www.icentreindia.com
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
iPhone now has 66% of all Web Traffic! David Moyer[_2_] AT&T Wireless 32 June 29th 09 11:50 AM
iPhone now has 66% of all Web Traffic! News[_2_] Cingular 23 June 29th 09 11:50 AM
iPhone now has 66% of all Web Traffic! Read more than 240,000 Kindle books on your iPhone or iPod touch Cingular 3 March 5th 09 12:56 AM
iPhone now has 66% of all Web Traffic! Kevin Weaver AT&T Wireless 0 March 5th 09 12:56 AM
Rogers hits goldmine with iPhone 3G (33% share) An Apple A Day Keeps Those BlackBerries Away! AT&T Wireless 0 February 20th 09 12:53 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 Mobile-Forum.
The comments are property of their posters.